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HETC

Application, Seminar Registration, Requirements

HETC Program Application: Please note that the application process is temporarily on hold. Thank you.   

Information: Deborah Allen, Faculty Director, CTAL, 212 Gore Hall, 302-831-2027

2013 Fall: UNIV 601, Peadogogy - Registration Form (pdf)
Please register by Friday, August 30.  

Dates and Time: Thursdays, September 26, October 3, 10, 24, November 7, 14, and 21 from 5:15-7:45p.m.
Location: Room 109, Memorial Hall

Program Application

Graduate students need to have at least one semester of teaching experience (i.e., classroom instruction, studio teaching, discussion session facilitation, or laboratory instruction) prior to starting the program. Interested students apply for admission directly to CTL and include in their application a statement of support from a faculty member in the discipline. Students who completed their TA appointment in a department other than their home department may ask the faculty advisor in their home department for a statement of support. Students are advised to select faculty who can best speak to their role as a TA and instructional effectiveness as well as their career goals of becoming future faculty.

Each semester/term CTL will enroll the graduate students in the seminars which they indicated on their application form. Seminar enrollment is limited to 20 participants to allow for maximum interaction. There is no tuition charge for the program.
Note. Exceptions to the teaching experience requirement will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Applicable Experience. Graduate students who have completed similar content areas within their departments, the ELI's ITA Program, previous CTL sessions or university-wide pedagogical seminars (e.g., ITUE) may apply this experience to the program. The department needs to submit written documentation to CTL on behalf of the student. The Associate Director, CTL and the Assistant Provost, Graduate & Professional Education, in coordination with departments, will make a recommendation regarding the equivalencies and substitutions using the general content area parameters.  The Associate Provost, Graduate & Professional Education will accept the recommendation. This collaborative process is designed to recognize the diversity of departmental training efforts currently in place, and to encourage further dialogue around TA development in the disciplines.

Program Requirements

Content areas do not need to be taken sequentially; students must complete all program requirements before graduation, but they can determine the timing of the program elements to best accommodate their academic schedule and professional needs. Departmental advisement for sequencing program components is critical. Content areas are delivered throughout the academic year. Certification is awarded upon completion of all program aspects and is included in the participant’s official transcript.

To receive the teaching certification graduate students must complete coursework in (1) pedagogy track including seminars on learning (UNIV 600) and pedagogy (UNIV 601), and (2) academic career preparation track including seminars on faculty roles (UNIV 602) and academic job search (UNIV 603).

In addition, the participant must:
  • Be observed by and receive reflective feedback by a faculty mentor in the discipline: Teaching Observation and Feedback by Faculty - you are advised to invite a faculty member in your discipline to observe your teaching who may also serve as a reference for your teaching effectiveness. More than one observation is recommended, if possible. The observation needs to be conducted while enrolled in the seminars.

  • HETC Fellows' Academic ePortfolio (video): Document his/her teaching, research, and service activities and accomplishments via a Professional Academic ePortfolio (pdf) using Goggle Sites: HETC academic ePortfolio template and showcase. The academic portfolio is reviewed by a departmental faculty and CTL staff. The complete ePortfolio needs to be submitted within two semesters after completion of all coursework, accompanied by a reflective statement on the portfolio process.

 

Goals and Curriculum

Program Goals

  • Strengthen the quality of undergraduate instruction.
  • Enhance the teaching effectiveness of TAs while at UD.
  • Provide a systematic and comprehensive preparation of graduate students for all aspects of their future faculty careers.
    • Become familiar with current pedagogical practices and research in higher education.
    • Provide opportunity to develop participants'  instructional skills in a mentored and collegial atmosphere.
    • Reflect on teaching practice and begin to engage in the scholarship of teaching.
    • Observe exemplary instructors.
    • Prepare for the demands of research, teaching and service in academic life.
    • Document scholarly and instructional competencies, accomplishments, and development through e-portfolios.
  • Document the teaching effectiveness of graduate students and bolster their credentials as they enter the postgraduate academic job market.
  • Provide official recognition for graduate students who have prepared themselves for the complex aspects of future faculty responsibilities.

Pedagogical & Professional Content Areas

The program focuses on teaching as scholarly work and is based on the following elements:

  • Research (on learning and teaching in higher education),
  • Application (of learning theory on concrete learning contexts), and
  • Reflection (on the effectiveness of teaching and assessment approaches to support student learning).

The program consists of two tracks: (1) pedagogy track including seminars on learning and pedagogy, and (2) academic career preparation track including seminars on faculty roles andacademic job search. The pedagogy track has been designed to be taken concurrently with teaching appointments, typically early in the graduate program; the academic career preparation track has been designed to be taken one year prior to going on the job market. It is not recommended to enroll in the seminars during the final year of doctoral study when candidates are completing their dissertations.

You may access UDSIS for seminar offerings and dates. Please note that the information about content area offerings is subject to change.

Learning (UNIV-600) - [10 weeks during spring semester] - Syllabus (tentative)
This content area explores the cognitive, affective, and social aspects of the learning process. The coursework seeks to help participants develop skills to facilitate student learning in their respective disciplines. Please keep in mind that you need to be teaching at the time you're taking UNIV-600 since the course is applied in nature; i.e., you will have opportunities to apply the learning theory to concrete learning contexts in your discipline.

Pedagogy (UNIV-601) - [10 weeks during fall semester] - Syllabus (tentative)
This content area familiarizes participants with sound teaching principles and innovative teaching methodologies that pertain to their academic fields. The coursework has a practical orientation, and seeks to help participants enhance their classroom performance and teach effectively in their respective disciplines. Please keep in mind that you need to be teaching at the time you're taking UNIV-601 since the course is applied in nature; i.e., you will have opportunities to apply research on effective teaching and pedagogical practices to concrete instructional contexts in your discipline.

Faculty Roles (UNIV-602) - [5 weeks during summer session] - Syllabus (tentative)
This content area introduces participants to the range of faculty roles and responsibilities at different types of academic institutions. The coursework seeks to help graduate students identify their ideal academic setting, and understand the possibilities and responsibilities concomitant to such appointments.  The content area is designed to enhance participants' awareness of academic career options.

Academic Job Search (UNIV-603) - [5 weeks during winter session] - Syllabus (tentative)
This content area helps graduate students prepare for their insertion into the academic work place by focusing on Curriculum Vitae (CV) construction, teaching portfolio preparation, and refining of interviewing skills. This course is co-designed and co-taught by staff from the Career Services Center and CTAL.

Program Schedule (Tentative)

During each semester/session several content areas will be offered as indicated in the chart below. Faculty will be invited to co-design and co-facilitate content areas. The first content areas were piloted during the 2003-2004 academic year.  For suggested sequencing, refer to the table below as well as the outlined possible sample program trajectories.

Seminar Offering Fall 2011
UNIV-601 010 - Pedagogy in Higher Education

This ten-week course is offered in an online format with several half-day interactive seminars. 
Faculty:  Gabriele Bauer, CTAL
You need to be teaching at the time you're taking UNIV-601 since the course is applied in nature; i.e., you will have opportunities to apply the learning theory to concrete learning contexts in your discipline.

Program Requirement Offerings Fall 2013
Teaching Observation and Feedback by Faculty
Academic ePortfolio Development with ePortfolio Mentor

Seminar Offerings Winter 2014
UNIV-603 010 - Academic Job Search

This five-week course is offered in an online format with several half-day interactive on-campus seminars.
Faculty:  Marianne Green, Career Services Center and Gabriele Bauer, CTAL

Program Requirement Offerings Winter 2014
Teaching Observation and Feedback by Faculty
Academic ePortfolio Development with ePortfolio Mentor

Seminar Offering Spring 2014
UNIV-600 010 - Learning in the College Classroom

This ten-week course is offered in an online format with several half-day interactive on-campus seminars. 
Faculty:  Gabriele Bauer, CTAL
You need to be teaching at the time you're taking UNIV-600 since the course is applied in nature; i.e., you will have opportunities to apply the learning theory to concrete learning contexts in your discipline.

Program Requirement Offering Spring 2014
Teaching Observation and Feedback by Faculty
Academic ePortfolio Development with ePortfolio Mentor

Seminar Offering First Summer Session 2013
UNIV-602 010 - Faculty Roles in Institutions of Higher Education

This five-week course is offered in an online format with several half-day, on-campus, interactive seminars.
Faculty:  Gabriele Bauer, CTAL

Program Requirement Offerings Summer 2013
Teaching Observation and Feedback by Faculty
 

 

SEMESTER/SESSION CONTENT AREA (Course #)
Winter Session: 13W Academic Job Search (UNIV-603)
Academic ePortfolio Development with ePortfolio Mentor
Teaching Observation and Feedback by Faculty
Spring Semester: 13S

 

Learning (UNIV-600)
Academic ePortfolio Development with ePortfolio Mentor
Teaching Observation and Feedback by Faculty

Summer Session: 13J Faculty Roles (UNIV-602)
Academic ePortfolio Development with ePortfolio Mentor
Teaching Observation and Feedback by Faculty
Fall Semester: 13F

 

Pedagogy (UNIV-601)
Academic ePortfolio Development with ePortfolio Mentor
Teaching Observation and Feedback by Faculty

Sample Program Trajectories Case A: Program completed in 2 semesters plus two sessions

SEMESTER/SESSION CONTENT AREA (Course #)
Spring Semester: 13S Learning (UNIV-600)
Summer Session: 13J Faculty Roles (UNIV-602)
Fall Semester: 13F Pedagogy (UNIV-601)
Teaching Observation and Feedback by Faculty
Winter Session: 14W

Academic Job Search (UNIV-603)

Case B: Program completed in 2 semesters plus 2 sessions

SEMESTER/SESSION CONTENT AREA (Course #)
Spring Semester: 13S Learning (UNIV-600)
Fall Semester: 13F Pedagogy (UNIV-601)
Winter Session: 14W Academic Job Search (UNIV-603)
Teaching Observation and Feedback by Faculty
Summer Session: 14J Faculty Roles (UNIV-602)

 

HETC Graduate Profiles

 
Carol Roach (Chemistry & Biochemistry)
Postdoctoral Fellow, Chemistry Department, University of
Missouri, MO
 
How has your HETC program participation aided in obtaining your current position?
I learned about different learning preferences that people may have such as visual, reading, auditory, and kinesthetic. I try to incorporate these preferences into my professional and poster talks so I can communicate my research effectively. I was also encouraged to ask faculty (besides my advisor) for teaching advice which led to me asking about career advice as well. Little did I know that these conversations would land me my current position. Because of my interactions with another professor in the department I was invited to present my research at a different conference. My presentation was attended by my future postdoc advisor; when I applied to her position I was immediately her first choice.

What aspects of the HETC program do you utilize regularly?
I interact with undergraduates, as well as graduate students in a teaching capacity. I learned in HETC to walk students through my thinking process, and I will often do this in the lab as I explain to students how I am resolving an issue that we have encountered. I never directly answer questions that any of the students pose to me about their research, and I remain patient as I wait for them to find the answer on their own. Sometimes I guide the students to the answer with a phrase like "well, where I would start with that problem is..." if they need assistance. This process helps students problem-solve and think about the issues involved.

Advice?
As a physical science major I really wasn't sure to what extent the teaching practices addressed in HETC were applicable to my field. Having completed the program, and working in a research department, I must say that the educational techniques I learned in HETC are invaluable! I can communicate with different types of learners because I learned to incorporate other learning styles into my communication, I have made several professional contacts within my department and outside because as this was purposefully required in the program. Sometimes we, as learners ourselves, compartmentalize information too much including what we learn in HETC. I have found that the HETC content is applicable to my current professional interactions, and I plan on continuing to use it throughout my career.   



kurtwilliamson.jpgKurt Williamson (Plant & Soil Sciences)
Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, College of William & Mary, VA
   
How has your HETC program participation aided in obtaining your current position?
I believe that the HETC program made me a much more competitive applicant for the position. I had a reasonably strong research record at the time I was applying, but my teaching record showed only teaching assistantships; the position is about 50% teaching, 50% research. HETC helped me to assemble a complete teaching portfolio, including a statement of teaching philosophy that I really worked hard to develop and refine! I submitted this portfolio with my application for the position at W&M. It definitely made the point that I took my teaching responsibilities seriously, thought carefully about my approaches, and was able to clearly articulate - and document - my teaching methods and progress as an instructor.

What aspects of the HETC program do you utilize regularly?
I use the material on developing course syllabi about twice a year - I am constantly revising and updating my approach, and I think about the goals I am aiming for, how I will accomplish those goals, and how I will know that they have been accomplished (assessment). I also use the material on "Getting students to do the reading" frequently - this is a perennial problem, unfortunately!

Advice?
I have this quote from E. O. Wilson painted on the wall of my research lab, in 18-inch letters:
"You are capable of more than you know. Choose a goal that seems right for you and strive to be the best, however hard the path. Aim high. Behave honorably. Prepare to be alone at times, and to endure failure. Persist! The world needs all you can give."
  

 Cass, Amy.jpgAmy Cass (Sociology & Criminal Justice)
Assistant Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, California State University, Fullerton
 
How has your HETC program participation aided in obtaining your current position?
 Although scary to complete, the video-recorded practice job interview was very helpful in preparing me for my campus visit. It’s important to really see yourself and how you appear to others before you go out on the job market.       
 
What aspects of the HETC program do you utilize regularly?
 If I had to pick just two things I use the most, they would have to be grading rubrics and active learning activities. The former makes assessment more objective, while the latter makes learning more fun and engaging.   
 
Advice: Don’t let a mentor, an advisor, or a favorite professor pick your future.  Although you might admire them or their advice, you must live everyday with whatever choice is made.  Pick something that will make you happy - at least most of the time.


hgriffiths.jpgHeather Griffiths (Sociology & Criminal Justice)
Assistant Professor, Fayetteville State University, Fayetteville, NC

How has your HETC program participation aided in obtaining your current position?
 I wanted a position in a university that emphasized quality teaching.  Including HETC on my CV was a great talking point on my job talk, and demonstrated my commitment to teaching and learning.  Having a portfolio of prepared assignments gave me a head start on active learning activities, and has given me a niche at my professional meetings - I am an active member of the Teaching and Learning Section in the American Sociological Association, I have published in a teaching workbook, and I have been invited to prepare an article for Teaching Sociology.

What aspects of the HETC program do you utilize regularly?
 The portfolio was a big help, but the format here is different, since we prepared a teaching portfolio and what I submit here is only part teaching, and includes some very specific style guidelines.

Advice: The job search process is exhausting and overwhelming for everyone.  Remember that you are not just taking a job, you are being interviewed to join a community. The people you meet are your future colleagues and potential friends, so present yourself accordingly.


 http://cte.udel.edu/sites/cte.udel.edu/files/u7/Jochen.jpgMike Jochen (Computer Science)
Assistant Professor, Computer Science
East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania
E Stroudsburg, PA 18301

 
How has your HETC program participation aided in obtaining your current position?
I feel the HETC assisted me on many levels. The first (and most practical) was creation of supporting documents within my portfolio. The exercises that we went through preparing teaching philosophy statements and CV helped me get my dossier in order for the interview process. I think this made me a stronger candidate. I certainly had no difficulty landing the tenure-track faculty position that I wanted.

Second, all the discussion and activities on learning theory & pedagogy while I was going through the program made me (I feel) a stronger member of faculty. I believe I am a better teacher because of the insight these activities gave me. I have even offered up suggestions to other members of faculty (which have now been adopted in their classrooms). As a junior member of faculty, I am getting senior faculty members approaching me for advice on teaching techniques & new forms of classroom activities.

What aspects of the HETC program do you utilize regularly?
Believe it or not, simple things like the one-minute paper -- something I picked up during one of our classes & that I use quite frequently.
Also, our department is currently undergoing a first-time review towards ABET accreditation (Accreditation Board for Engineering & Technology) -- a very rigorous accreditation process. The many discussions on assessment that we had in HETC have helped me greatly. I am a member of the department ABET committee & we are the ones designing the assessment metrics, instruments, & criteria.

Advice: As the old saying goes, "You get out of the program that which you put into it." Even if you are swamped in your own research, dissertation writing, . . . active participation in program can (and did) translate into real benefit, both during job search and after accepting the position.


JH picture.jpgJessica Hodge (Sociology and Criminal Justice)
 
How has your HETC program participation aided in obtaining your current position?
I feel that the HETC program was a huge help in securing my position at UMKC. Not only was I better prepared for the job market (e.g. had a teaching portfolio ready to go), but I had also learned how to speak the “job market language,” knew what questions to ask when on the interview, and knew how to negotiate when offered the position.

What aspects of the HETC program do you utilize regularly?
I am definitely much more aware of using a variety of learning techniques within the classroom. I knew that people learned in different ways, but I was not able to articulate the importance of using various methods. I am also much more concerned with moving beyond the PowerPoint lecture and having active learning tools ready to go.

Advice:
Pay attention!! Although some of the busy work may seem just that – busy work – it serves a purpose and it is definitely helpful when on the market and during those first few years on the job.


 wu.jpgBonnie Wu (Sociology and Criminal Justice)
Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
 
How has your HETC program participation aided in obtaining your current position?
The HETC program greatly aided me in obtaining my current position. 1. The "Job market" component of this program provided comprehensive information about the whole process of searching for positions, preparing application documents, getting ready for phone interview and campus visit, presenting best-self during campus visit, and negotiating an offer. Being fully prepared in each step of the process is a key to success. 2. I especially liked the session when department chairs are brought in to talk about their expectations of job candidates. Getting to know the "buyer" side of the market is always nice. I also loved the session when students who already got offers to come to class and talked about their experience.

What aspects of the HETC program do you utilize regularly?
 The components about teaching and student learning overall are helpful. There is no particular program/activity that I utilize regularly, but I think the most important thing we learn from HETC teaching and learning courses is less about particular skills or activities, but a broader issue of teaching philosophy and goals.


Maria Capursi (Mathematics)
Lecturer in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Central Florida, Orlando Florida

 
How has your HETC program participation aided in obtaining
your current position?
The part of the program about job search was definitely the most useful. By the time I started applying for jobs I knew how to write a cover letter, what to look for in an ad, and my teaching statement and resume had already gone through five or six revisions. Also, the program made me rethink the way I present a lecture and suggested me ways to increase student partecipation in the classroom. When I was looking for jobs, I implemented this in the teaching presentations I prepared for interviews. When I interviewed at UCF, I had the committee answer questions and work out a problem that I then solved at the board, just like I would with my students. I guess they liked it :)
 
What aspects of the HETC program do you utilize regularly?
The work in pairs in the classroom is definitely what I use the most. What I have learned about assessment during the HETC program will soon come particularly useful, as I will be preparing an assessment plan for the redesigned Precalculus course together with the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning  (UCF's CTE).

Advice:

The Program might feel a bit overwhelming at times, but it is definitely worth it, so stick with it! You never know when something you've learned there will turn out to be useful in your career.



Nicole Ruggiano (Social Work)
Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at Florida International University, Miami, Florida
 
 
How has your HETC program participation aided in obtaining your current position?
The HETC program gave me the skills and knowledge needed to be competitive during a constrained job market. I believe that the greatest job-hunting skill that I developed through the program was learning to articulate how my skills, abilities, and knowledge were a good fit for open positions and prospective universities. For instance, when writing my application cover letters (which is essentially your first contact with a potential employer), I learned to personalize each letter to reflect the curriculum, research needs, and mission statement of each position. For conference and telephone calls, I researched the faculty bios, current research projects, and the student population at each university so that I demonstrate my ability to work effectively as an academic within that department. For instance, I applied to work at universities in California, Texas, and Florida where I knew that a large proportion of students and local populations are Hispanic. I anticipated answering questions related to teaching Hispanic students, particularly large numbers of students who have English as a second language, and/or are the first in their family to go to college. Because I anticipated these questions, I was prepared to talk about my experiences working with minority students, my interests in multi-cultural learning environments, my desire to further master the Spanish language, and how working with students will help further my research agenda, because they may be able to help me gain access to communities that I may not otherwise be able to do, being a white, non-Hispanic researcher.
 
Learning to do background research on potential employers also helped me navigate my campus visits. Knowing facutly members' backgrounds and research interests, I was able to point out potential partnerships, similarities in research interests, and ask questions that reflected a genuine interest in working within that environment. This also helps you be more personable with the faculty (and in turn more likable!). In addition, I learned what was expected of me as a faculty member in a research institution, so I was able to articulate how my experience would help me excel in research, teaching, and service within the university community.
 
 
What aspects of the HETC program do you utilize regularly?
Personally, I feel that networking is the most valuable skill I use regularly. I work at an institution that has demanding teaching AND research requirements. By networking and developing relationships with other scholars and practitioners in my field, I have become more efficient in my work output. For instance, since starting my appointment: I have co-authored several papers with other scholars, to maximize my publications; I have developed positive relationships with many of my fellow faculty members who have gone out of their way to help me write research grants and have advocated for me to teach a summer course that was not previously going to be offered; I gained trust with community members who have provided access to clients and programs for my research; and I reached out to a fellow junior faculty member, who I have lunch with twice each month to talk about the frustrations of being junior faculty members. While these activities have required my skills in research, teaching, and writing to succeed, without networking, I would be doing everything by myself. For instance, a few weeks ago a faculty member from another department contacted me to say that he was working on a large research grant where he needed someone with my expertise to be on the research team. One of my contacts within the community suggested my name to him as a person of interest and he wanted to know if I would like to work on the project. The project was related to my research background, so I agreed to be the Co-PI, which cut my work for writing a large grant proposal in half.

Advice:

My biggest advice to current HETC fellows is to be flexible on the job market. First, you need to be flexible in the positions you apply for. I enjoy teaching and research, so I applied to numerous positions, because I wasn't exactly sure what I wanted to do. I applied to work at small liberal arts colleges, large research institutions, private sector think tanks, tenure track positions, non-tenure track positions, and positions for the federal government. All of them were interesting, although I am happy where I ultimately ended up working. You also need to be flexible in how you market yourself. I was on the job market for two years. I realize now that during my first year, I was too narrow in how I presented my skills and research. My second year, I was more strategic in how I presented my experience and abilities. In fact, within the variety of positions I applied for, I ended up interviewing at every different type of position I applied for! I even remember during my interview at the Library of Congress' Congressional Research Service explaining how my teaching experience would be especially useful in presenting research information to decision-makers in Washington. Thinking outside of the box when articulating your potential achievement will help you reach a larger audience during your job search.


 
Stephanie Bolte (Chemistry & Biochemistry)
Product Compliance Assistant at Ashland Hercules Water Technologies
 
How has your HETC program participation aided in obtaining your current position?
 The interviewing skills I learned in the HETC program served me well when I went on the job market rather suddenly.  I felt prepared going into my interviews, even if they weren't traditional academic interviews.

What aspects of the HETC program do you utilize regularly?
Although I'm not currently working in a teaching capacity, the HETC program helped me develop my communication skills as well as helped me understand how other people may process information. This is very helpful when I am working with customers.

Advice: Be willing to explore alternate paths! My original path to a teaching career changed suddenly, but I am still finding a way to pursue teaching as I look for adjunct teaching positions.
 

 
Julie (Lloyd) Palkendo (Chemistry & Biochemistry)
 Assistant Professor, Chemistry, Department of Physical Sciences, Kutztown University, PA

How has your HETC program participation aided in obtaining your current position?
I have no doubt that my participation in the HETC program aided in obtaining my current position.  Colleges and universities focusing on "teaching" want candidates that 1) have experience teaching; and 2) have a genuine interest in the process of student learning.  Especially for hires coming directly from graduate school, these types of schools want to see that the candidate will have a good balance between research and teaching.  Without the program, it may be more difficult for research-intensive graduate students to display their interest of teaching witihin their discipline.

What aspects of the HETC program do you utilize regularly?
Seeing as I'm building 80% of my courses from scratch, the course material regarding course design, syllabi, matching objectives to assessments has been extremely useful. Also, I often ask for student feedback to improve the course and my instruction. How to develop good tools for feedback as well as active learning tools, I use on a regular basis.  Let's just say - I'd be sunk without this knowledge base!

Advice: Be true to yourself, and consider your ideal position.  Match your personal goals to the goals, mission, visions of a faculty position, department, university.

Chanele Moore (Sociology & Criminal Justice)
Adjunct faculty at Holy Family University, Philadelphia, PA
 
How has your HETC program participation aided in obtaining your current position?
My experience with HETC helped me prepare a thoughtful and detailed application to HFU. I did not get a tenure-track position (because of the recession) but distinguished myself as an excellent candidate.
 
What aspects of the HETC program do you utilize regularly?
One thing I rely on regularly is reflexive teaching. At least twice during the semester I think about how the class is going and how it could be improved, either mid semester or the next time I teach it. I talk to other faculty about what works for them and also ask the students what is helping them learn. This has increased my confidence and effectiveness in regard to connecting with students.
 
Advice: Be confident about what you do well and find confidence boosting ways to improve areas of weakness.


 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

What is HETC and what are the benefits of participating in the program?
HETC is a graduate program offering designed to both enhance your teaching effectiveness while at UD and prepare you comprehensively for your future position as a faculty member. Its focus is on the application of learning principles and best practices to your disciplinary context, reflection, awareness of the higher education context, and preparation of job application materials. The program is designed to offer graduate students a comprehensive preparation for their careers as future faculty. The certification will appear on your transcript.
 
How common are preparing future faculty programs in higher education? 
Preparing professors to teach, Inside Higher Education, October 15, 2010
 
Will the certification allow me to teach at the high school level?
HETC does not provide certification for teaching at the secondary level. You would need to contact the School of Education for programs that certify you to teach at the high school level.
 
Who is eligible to apply?
Full time graduate students at the University of Delaware, postdoctoral candidates at UD who completed their graduate studies at UD.
 
Is the HETC program open to postdocs?
Yes, if the applicant holds a doctorate degree from the University of Delaware.
 
When should I enroll?
The program is offered on an ongoing basis and you may apply to the program any time. We recommend starting the program in the spring semester, UNIV-600 - Learning, as the course is designed to help you apply best practice to your actual teaching. You need to be teaching at the same time as you're taking this seminar.
 
What do I need to submit to apply to HETC program?
To apply to the HETC program, complete the online program application: http://cte.udel.edu/programs/hetc/higher-education-teaching-certification.html
In addition, you need to submit a statement of intent and faculty statement of support - both described in the program application form - and obtain advisor or department chairperson signatures on both application and course registration form. Then, submit the entire set of materials to Gabriele Bauer at 212 Gore Hall and we will review your application packet.
 
Should I obtain the letter of support from my advisor or from the faculty member who I have worked with as a TA?
Obtain the letter of support from the faculty member who knows about your academic career aspirations and can speak to the perceived value of your program participation in relation to your academic degree program and career goals.
 
Where should I drop off the application materials?
212 Gore Hall, phone: 302-831-2027
 
When are seminars offered and in what sequence should I take them?
 
I noticed the deadline for fall is June 15.  I will be away for some of September conducting research for my dissertation.  Is it possible to apply to the program later in the academic year and start during winter session? 
You may apply to the program at any time independent of your intended start date for the seminars.  You're welcome to apply to the program during the summer and start taking seminars in winter session. 
 
How will I know that I have been accepted into the program?
You will be contacted via email by the program director.
 
Can I audit HETC seminars? What are the guidelines?
You may apply to audit, space permitting. As an auditor, you set your own learning goals and determine what you’d like to gain from the seminar. The students who are formally enrolled in the HETC program get priority in receiving feedback on their assignments. Time permitting, the instructor will give you feedback on materials that you develop in the course. Given your status as auditor neither a letter of recommendation from a faculty member in your discipline nor your advisor’s signature on the application and enrollment forms are required. If you're planning to enroll as audit, please complete the program registration form only and submit to our office (212 Gore Hall).
 
I learned that most of the seminars are offered in hybrid format, online (Sakai) and face-to-face on-campus seminars. I will go back to China for a visit this winter, can I still take the seminar without being on campus?
You do need to be on campus at the time that you're enrolled in the different program seminars. The program is offered in a hybrid environment (combination of online and face-to-face instruction); it is not a distance learning environment.
 
Am I required to teach in order to enroll in HETC seminars?
You need to hold a TA or teaching appointment at the time that you are enrolled in the pedagogy track of the HETC program, i.e., UNIV 600 – Learning (offered spring) and UNIV 601 – pedagogy (offered fall) so that you can immediately apply what you are learning in the seminar to their own teaching. The assignments are designed to help you apply principles learned in the courses to reflect on their effectiveness. You need to be actually working with students to be able to apply teaching practices to a "real" setting and practice implementing them.
 
The website states that graduate students must be teaching at the time they are taking the pedagogy seminars. Does "teaching" include leading problem-solving sessions?
"Teaching" refers to you having instructional interactions with students on a regular basis, either in your role as a graduate TA or as an autonomous instructor. Leading problem-solving sessions does qualify as "teaching." TA appointments as “graders, “office hours facilitators,” and “review session facilitators,” do not qualify as “teaching” as TAs do not have ongoing instructional contact with students.
 
Is it possible to take the pedagogy seminars without a concurrent teaching appointment or is it mandatory to teach?
As the pedagogy seminars are applied in nature, ideally you will be teaching while taking the seminars. If a formal teaching appointment is not part of your remaining academic program, you may ask faculty to guest lecture in a course during these semesters and draw on your prior teaching experience to be able to apply theory to practice.
 
A required graduate seminar in my department covers pedagogy and learning. Could this course substitute for the HETC pedagogy courses?
As the program is designed to complement and build upon departmental instructional development efforts, your departmental course may substitute for a portion of the HETC program. To help determine what areas may be applicable to the HETC program curriculum, you need to submit the course syllabus to Gabriele Bauer for review.
 
Does it matter in what order I take the seminars?
UNIV 600 and 601, pedagogy track seminars, are designed to be taken early on as they coincide with TA appointments to enhance your teaching effectiveness while at UD. You may apply to the program any time regardless of when you're planning to enroll in your first seminar.
 
When can I complete the faculty observation and portfolio? 
Teaching Observation and Feedback by Faculty is completed independent of any particular seminar. The observation must be completed while enrolled in the seminars. The portfolio is completed independent of any particular seminar. The portfolio must be completed within 2 semesters after completing all course work. Specific sessions on portfolio completion are offered every semester. Throughout your seminars you will develop materials that you will include in your portfolio.
You have access to Faculty Observation and Portfolio resources in Sakai.
 
Would it be wise to do the academic job search last or should I start with the job search?
It depends on your projected graduation date and when you're planning to go on the job market. If you're planning to graduate within the next 2 years, I suggest you enroll in the winter seminar this winter term so that you give yourself enough time to get your academic job application materials prepared.
 
What if I am scheduled to graduate before completing all of the required course work? Can I still obtain the certification?
Because of your graduation date you will not be able to complete the entire program. Therefore, you will not receive a statement of certification on your official transcript. All the seminars that you completed will be recorded on your official transcript.
 
I am interested in joining the HETC program during winter session, but I have some doubts. I want to spend most of my winter session working on my research project. How much time does the seminar take?
Given that the HETC seminars are a graduate program offering, you need to be able to dedicate time specifically for the courses (about 6 hours/week - many students spend more time). In addition, the winter and summer courses are offered over a 5-week period and so your time would be spent over a shorter period of time (as is the case with all winter / summer session courses).
 
I am interested in taking the winter session seminar on the Academic Job Search. However, I will be out of town the last two weeks of January and will miss the last two seminars. Can I still enroll?
The winter seminar is part of an entire professional development program for graduate students pursuing faculty positions. If you will miss a major portion of the program, you will not be able to enroll.
 
What does the faculty letter of support need to provide?
The letter is intended as a faculty statement of support for program participation based on your academic career aspirations in the discipline and your current instructional role in the program. The anticipated length is about 2-3 paragraphs.
 
I'm lining up documents for academic job applications. How can I provide the strongest possible documentation of my completion of HETC to burnish my teaching credentials in a substantial way?
As a result of your participation in the HETC program, you have produced those documents that tend to be asked for, especially in applications to teaching-intensive institutions, such as cover letter, CV, teaching statement, course syllabus, assessment tool, summary of student rating data, example of formative student feedback, and ability to engage in classroom-based research to help address instructional issues. These documents constitute the strongest evidence of your teaching effectiveness and thoughtful approach to teaching in the discipline. Having authored these documents will have enhance your ability to effectively present yourself during the interview process. You may address your successful HETC completion in the cover letter (in addition to inclusion on your CV) to highlight your current knowledge of pedagogical practice and assessment to support student learning as well as commitment to continued professional development in teaching. Department faculty who have observed your teaching and serve as a teaching reference, may describe how your teaching in the discipline has changed as a result of your HETC participation. 
Successful HETC completion is noted on your official transcript.

 

Outline: Faculty Observation

TEACHING OBSERVATION AND FACULTY FEEDBACK


 

Observation of one's teaching, particularly if conducted in a collaborative, professional and structured manner, can offer significant documentation of the teaching and learning process within a specific disciplinary context. Constructive feedback and discussion further provide insights into teaching strengths and weaknesses in a supportive manner, and they serve as catalysts for teaching enhancement (Millis, 1992). Observations should lead to the reinforcement of effective teaching practices or specific changes. 

As part of your participation in the HETC program, you have the opportunity to be observed by a faculty mentor in your discipline and to receive constructive feedback on your teaching and classroom dynamics. The observation is complemented by guided self-reflection. Keep in mind that the observation provides only one source of information. You need to balance that information against some other forms of instructional feedback, such as student evaluations and your own perceptions. Enjoy this opportunity to engage in dialogue with faculty about teaching in your discipline. 

This observation process models one approach to learning more about yourself as an instructor and documenting your discipline-specific teaching methods. Consider including this documentation (with some modification) in your academic professional ePortfolio. We hope you will incorporate this activity into your ongoing professional development as junior faculty. 
 

A. Purpose

The purpose of the teaching observation and faculty feedback is four-fold:

  • Clarify your understanding of how you teach in the discipline and how your teaching supports student learning.
  • Compare your understanding of how you teach with the feedback of others.
  • Affirm what works well and why and to decide what to change and how to change it.
  • Continue doing what works well and incorporate changes into your teaching.

          (Weimer. M.1990. Improving college teaching).
 

B. Guidelines - please share these with your faculty observer

Please follow the following guidelines as you engage in this portion of the HETC program. For questions, clarification contact Gabriele Bauer, HETC program coordinator.

(a) The class visited should be typical.

(b) The faculty observer and HETC Fellow should meet prior to the observation to share information re the specific class being observed, and to identify what types of feedback would be most helpful to the instructor - Pre-observation meeting

(c) The students should be informed of the upcoming observation and its purpose; for example,  "A visitor will join the class to learn more about the course."  Ideally, the observer is introduced to the students.

(d) The faculty observer should keep the following in mind: 

  • Approach the observation process in an objective, collegiate manner.
  • During the observation , assume a student perspective to focus on pedagogical activities in the classroom rather than content issues. Also, assume the role of an analytical, sympathetic critic.
  • Take notes during the observation - Classroom Observation Log. (.doc) 
  • Remain uninvolved during class, refrain from participating in class activities.
  • Conduct post-observation meeting.

(e) The HETC Fellow should keep the following in mind:

  • Invite a faculty member in the discipline to participate in this teaching observation and feedback. 
  • Explain the process and the guidelines to the faculty member (refer the faculty to this webpage). 
  • Arrange pre-observation meeting.
  • Take active role in the process by completing self-reflection activities

(f) The constructive feedback on the observation (Post-observation meeting) should be:
     (Brookfield, S. The skillful teacher and Powers, B. 1992. Instructor excellence)

  • Specific and descriptive.
  • Informative.
  • Concrete with specific examples.
  • Balanced in terms of effective teaching behaviors and areas for improvement.
  • Given promptly to reinforce performance.
  • Future-oriented, i.e., focused on both short-term and long-term actions.

(g) The HETC Fellow should submit the following materials within two weeks of the observation, if possible:

Submit as hard copies via intercampus mail OR as word attachments via e-mail to Gabriele Bauer,CTL, 212 Gore Hall.
 

C. Classroom Observation and Faculty Feedback Process - "Ideal" Procedure

(a) HETC Fellow invites faculty mentor from discipline to participate in process and arranges pre-observation meeting

(b) HETC Fellow and observer meet for pre-observation meeting

(c) Classroom visit take place. Observer completes Classroom Observation Log. (.doc)

(d) HETC Fellow completes Classroom Observation Self-Assessment Log. (.doc)

(e) HETC Fellow and observer meet for post-observation meeting

(f) HETC Fellow completes Reflective Narrative (.doc) and submits both observation documents to Gabriele Bauer.

(g) Program coordinator provides feedback and confirmation that the HETC Fellow has successfully completed this portion of the HETC program.
 

D. Pre-Observation Meeting: Guidelines

The HETC Fellow and faculty observer meet to prepare for the observation and discuss: 

  1. Overview of the course: What does the instructor hope to accomplish during the semester? How well prepared and motivated are the students? How does the instructor typically teach the class? How does the instructor  feel things have been going so far?
  2. Specific class meeting to be observed: What does the instructor hope to accomplish during this particular session? What will the  students learn during this session? What will the instructor be doing? What will the students be doing (e.g., lecture, group work, writing, power point presentation) and how will their activities support their learning?
  3. Types of feedback most helpful to the instructor (e.g., organization and presentation of content, pacing of content delivery, interaction with students, response to student questions).
  4. Logistics: Date, time, location of visit. Decide on seating arrangement during observation - typically in the back of the room or to the side to have good overview.


E. Post-Observation Meeting: Guidelines

The discussion is based on the HETC Fellow's and the faculty observer's observation notes and reflections. The observer helps the HETC Fellow describe and analyze what happened in class, including any suggestions for improvement. The following set of questions provide ways to get started. 

  • Ask questions to help clarify certain aspects of instruction; offer suggestions for specific teaching approaches that may help this instructor (e.g., writing, group work, phrasing of questions). For example: Tell me a bit about your response to the class I observed.  What was your impression of how the class went? What worked well for you in this class? Why? Is there anything you wished you had done differently? Why? How?
  • Try to describe specifically and objectively what you observed and give direct examples. Provide suggestions for enhancement during the face-to-face meeting.
  • Keep the feedback focused, specific and non-judgmental.
  • Share your own teaching stories, practices.
  • Avoid prescriptive language.


F. Reading 

Millis, B. (1992). Conducting effective peer classroom observations. In Wulff, D., & Nyquist, J. (eds.). To improve the academy (pp. 189-201). Stillwater, OK: New Forums Press. (pdf)
 

G. Observation and Reflection Instruments

a. Classroom Observation Log - Faculty Observer (.doc) 

Faculty observer documents and records the teaching process during the observation. Also, refers to the document during the post-observation meeting.

b. Classroom Observation Self-Assessment Log - HETC Fellow (.doc)

HETC Fellow reflects on the observation. Also, refers to the document during the post-observation meeting.

c. Reflective Narrative - HETC Fellow (.doc)

HETC Fellow synthesizes observation and discussion and considers areas for teaching enhancement.

UNIV 603 Syllabus

UNIV 603-010: Academic Job Search

Winter Session 2008



Course Information Course Goals Course Format
Assignments and Grading Readings Teaching Approach

 


Instructors

Marianne Green, M.A., Assistant Director
Bank of America Career Services Center, 401 Academy Street
Office Hours by appointment
Phone: 831-1232

Gabriele Bauer, Ph.D., Assistant Director
Center for Teaching Effectiveness, 212 Gore Hall
Office Hours by appointment
Phone: 831-2914

Please use WebCT mail to communicate about course logistics with your instructors. We will try to reply to your e-mail messages within 24 hours.

Welcome

This course has been designed for graduate students across disciplines who are pursuing future careers as faculty members at institutions of higher education. As professionals with complementary academic backgrounds and professional responsibilities at the University of Delaware, we have collaborated to design this course, and we are looking forward to teaching it as a team. Each one of us will take the lead in a particular unit and serve as the primary contact person and resource for that unit. We welcome your input and questions; they are essential to making this course personally meaningful and relevant to you. We look forward to working with you and learning from you.

 

 


Course Information
Course Description

This course entitled “Academic Job Search” constitutes part of the academic career development track of the Higher Education Teaching Certification (HETC) program.

Context

The academic job search is a complex process with multiple variables, some within your control (e.g., academic training, skills), some out of your control (e.g., state of the job market, employer needs, conditions within your discipline). This course will focus on those aspects that remain within your control—presentation of self, academic work, research and practice so that you will be successful in securing a position in your field.

This course will prepare you for the academic job search by introducing you to major aspects and resources. You will enhance your knowledge of the academic job search by researching the diverse institutions to apply to and the diverse nature of faculty positions. You will interview faculty to develop a deeper understanding of the search process in your discipline. You will develop job application materials, such as a curriculum vitae, a teaching statement and / or research statement, and participate in a mock interview. The course will help you refine both your application documents and interviewing skills via constructive feedback, and also enhance your confidence. In addition, the course will introduce you to post-doc appointments, non-faculty positions, and other career options and help you transfer your academic expertise, training and skills to non-academic settings.

The course consists of three units, each pertaining to a different aspect of the academic job search.

Unit 1: What documentation is needed for the academic job search?
Unit 2: How do I prepare for the academic job search process? How do I conduct myself during the academic job search?
Unit 3: What are do’s and don’ts of job searching? What are requirements for post-doc positions? What are viable alternatives to academic positions?


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Course Goals
This course provides activities, experiences, readings, and resources that will help you:
  • Utilize your graduate studies to transition into an academic career.
  • Prepare for the academic job search process.
    -- Apply your research skills to the academic context and conventions of your discipline.
    -- Develop and refine job application documents, such as a curriculum vitae, a teaching statement and / or research statement.
    -- Refine your interviewing and academic presentation skills.
  • Address conceptions about academic careers.
  • Consider alternatives to the academic workplace, as appropriate.
  • Reflect on your personal academic career goals and values to make meaningful professional choice.


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Teaching Approach
The instructors believe that, given the practical focus of the course, it is critical to engage you in active learning activities, provide you with timely and constructive feedback, and to provide opportunities for self-assessment of your performance as well as reflection on enhancement. You will be actively engaged in several ways: by integrating concepts from the readings into the design of your job application documents, interviewing faculty and peers, receiving constructive feedback on your documents. Your questions and observation will also contribute to making this an active learning environment. Several guest speakers will share their expertise, knowledge, and experience on topics regarding the academic job search process and post-doc appointments.

Many of you will be taking the various content areas of the HETC program at the same time, thus forming a learning community. As a member of this learning community you will engage in informed conversation and reflections regarding higher education with the same cohort of peers, continue to learn from each other, and provide support and resources to each other. The online discussions facilitate this continued conversation and reflection.

Instructional methods utilized in the course (both online and in-class):

  • Small group work and discussion.
  • Class discussion.
  • Individual readings, writing, and reflection.
  • Guest faculty.


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Course Format
This course has been designed to be completed in five weeks. You will complete most of the work on-line (WebCT environment). Please refer to "Getting Started" concerning effective utilization of WebCT. In addition, you will meet on five designated Tuesday evenings to discuss the readings, participate in interactive, hands-on activities, and address critical aspects of the academic job search in conversation with peers and guests. The seminars have been scheduled from 5:00p.m.-7:00p.m. in 109 Memorial Hall as follows:
  • January 8, 2008: Seminar 1
  • January 15, 2008: Seminar 2
  • January 22, 2008: Seminar 3
  • January 29, 2008: Seminar 4
  • February 5, 2008: Seminar 5
You will need to participate in all seminars.

In case of UD closure due to severe weather, as announced on the University homepage, the following dates have been set for the seminar meetings in location TBA:
  • Thursday, January 10, 2008: Seminar 1
  • Thursday, January 17, 2008: Seminar 2
  • Thursday, January 24, 2008: Seminar 3
  • Thursday, January 31, 2008: Seminar 4
  • Thursday, February 7, 2008: Seminar 5

University Guidelines for Responsible Computing to assure appropriate use of computing resources.


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Assignments and Grading
This course is non-credit bearing and graded on a Pass/Fail basis. The assignments are designed to help you work immediately with the information and to apply it to your specific academic / professional needs. The course consists of two types of assignments: (1) online discussions for each unit; and (2) application assignments. The discussions help you synthesize and evaluate the course content concerning academic job search practice in your field. The application assignments allow you to apply the information garnered from the readings to your specific disciplinary academic job search context and develop specific documents for your job application process.

Online Discussions and
Application Assignments

The online discussions and application assignments are described in each unit: Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3

To receive a passing grade, you will need to complete the following requirements:

To receive a passing grade, you will need to complete the following requirements:
  • Attend and actively participate in seminar activities. You need to attend all seminars. Inform the instructors in advance of absences.
  • Complete core readings prior to each seminar. You need to keep up with the readings as they form the basis for assignments and seminars.
  • Contribute meaningfully to online discussions.
  • Complete the application assignments at a satisfactory level, incorporate constructive feedback, and submit on time.
  • Participate fully in the evaluation of the entire seminar. Your constructive feedback is essential in enhancing this course.
Each content area unit is structured as follows:
  • Core readings support the seminar activities and prepare you for the assignments. Please complete required readings prior to each seminar.
  • Supplementary readings build upon the core readings and provide additional explanations, examples and illustrations.
  • Online discussions allow you to synthesize, evaluate and think back on the readings, particularly as they pertain to your job search preparation in the discipline.
  • Refer to "Assignments" or calendar for assignment descriptions and to keep track of your work.
All applications and discussions need to be completed online and submitted by the due date. You are welcome to submit your work prior to the due date.

Ethical Academic Conduct

You are responsible for understanding and acting according to the University of Delaware's policy concerning ethical academic conduct. You are expected to be honest and forthright in all of your academic work. Attempts to falsify or plagiarize will be treated in accordance with University policy.

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Readings
You will find both the required readings and supplementary resources allocated for each unit. The material will be provided in several forms: (a) electronically – you can access directly in WebCT; (b) print – a photocopy of the material will be available in the Course Reserves section of the University of Delaware Library; and (c) print – some books will be available in the library at the Bank of America Career Services Center. A listing of General Course Resources is also provided. In addition to the resources provided in the course, also access the University of Delaware electronic library holdings, your department library, and the Internet for references.

Back to contents


Last Updated: January 3, 2008

UNIV 602 Syllabus

UNIV 602-010: Faculty Roles in Institutions of Higher Education

First Summer Session 2007



Course Information Course Goals Course Format
Assignments and Grading Readings Teaching Approach

 


"A successful academic core is rooted in a clear sense of contribution (What do you want to do?), an honest assessment of talent (What do you do well?), a choice of method (How will you make your contribution?), and knowledge what is joyful to you (What do you like to do best?)."
Gallos, J. (1996). Rhythms of academic life. Personal accounts of careers in academia.

Instructor

Gabriele Bauer, Ph.D., Assistant Director
Center for Teaching Effectiveness, 212 Gore Hall
Office hours by appointment
gabriele@udel.edu
Phone: 831-2914

Please use WebCT mail to communicate with the instructor and fellow students. I will try to reply to your e-mail messages within 24 hours.

Welcome

This course has been designed for graduate students across disciplines who are pursuing careers as faculty members at institutions of higher education. As you are preparing for the transition from graduate school to a faculty appointment, you may experience emotions that range from excitement and "can't wait!" to anxiety and uncertainty. A specialist in your discipline, you may find yourself an amateur on the new campus. The experiences that you bring with you are foremost the experiences of graduate education, not the experiences of faculty status. How can you maximize these experiences, prepare yourself for the transition, and achieve the best fit among your academic preparation, personal needs, institutional and departmental characteristics?

I look forward to exploring the terrain of faculty life at various types of institutions with you and helping you prepare for an effective transition. I welcome your input and questions; they are essential to making this course personally meaningful and relevant to you.

 

 


Course Information
Course Description

This course entitled “Faculty roles in institutions of higher education” reflects one content area of the Higher Education Teaching Certification (HETC) program that is designed to provide a systematic and comprehensive preparation of graduate students for all aspects of their future faculty careers. The program is open to all graduate students (both at the Masters and Doctoral levels) who intend to become future faculty (regardless of discipline).

Context

Each year, hundreds of graduate students begin new faculty appointments. How did they make this career decision? What facilitates their transition? How do they settle into a new job and establish themselves as academics? What is expected of them at different types of institutions? How do they balance their professional work and personal lives?

The main goal of this course is to help you acquire a basic understanding of the higher education context, the types and characteristics of academic institutions, and the multifaceted roles of faculty through readings, research, discussions, and assignments that will allow you to make informed career decisions, enhance your awareness of academic career issues and prepare you for your responsibilities as junior faculty in your discipline. This course builds upon the knowledge and skills acquired in the course focused on the academic job search, UNIV 603.

The course consists of three units, each pertaining to a different aspect of faculty roles and responsibilities at different types of institutions.

Unit 1: Characteristics of various types of academic institutions and implications for faculty worklife
Transition from graduate work to academic profession
June 7 - June 14

Unit 2: Academic profession: roles, responsibilities, expectations, rewards and challenges
Experiences, stories and advice of junior faculty colleagues
June 15 - June 25

Unit 3: Academic productivity and success: The road to tenure and beyond
June 26 - July 5

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Course Goals
This course provides experiences and resources that will help you:
  • Prepare for the transition from graduate study to a professional career by asking you to think about what it is to work in a faculty position.
  • Enhance your knowledge of the higher education context by researching the various types of academic institutions and their characteristics.
  • Explore the multifaceted roles of faculty in higher education, such as advisor, committee member, conference presenter, grant writer, researcher, teacher, time and task manager.
  • Apply aspects of faculty work life to the context, expectations and conventions of your discipline.
  • Deliberate standards and principles of professional ethics and delineate guidelines for your professional behavior in the discipline.
  • Reflect on your personal academic career aspirations and beliefs based on your understanding of the issues presented in the course
  • Design an action plan to help prepare for your responsibilities as junior faculty in your discipline and to help manage aspects of faculty life.
  • Enhance your readiness to start a faculty position - prepare or refine your teaching statement (philosophy).
  • Work within a a supportive forum in which you discuss aspects of your future faculty career with faculty and peers.
  • Identify and use research and resources that help you prepare for and succeed in your junior faculty position.


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Teaching Approach
The instructor believes that, given the practical focus of the course, it is critical to engage you in active learning activities, provide you with timely and constructive feedback, and to provide opportunities for self-assessment of your performance as well as reflection on enhancement. You will be actively engaged in several ways: by integrating concepts from the readings into the research of institutions and faculty roles and responsibilities, interviewing junior faculty, and receiving peer and instructor feedback on your teaching statement. Your questions and observations will also contribute to making this an active learning environment. Panel discussions with guest faculty from various institutions are the central aspect of the seminars. The faculty guests will share their expertise, stories, and experience on topics regarding institutional and departmental culture, faculty life, tenure process, research, advising, and publication.

Many of you will be taking the various content areas of the HETC program at the same time, thus forming a learning community. As a member of this learning community you will engage in informed discussions about higher education with the same cohort of peers, continue to learn from each other, and provide support and resources to each other. The online discussions facilitate this ongoing conversation and reflection.

Instructional methods utilized in the course (both online and in-class):

  • Team-based projects.
  • Small group work and discussion.
  • Class discussion.
  • Case study analysis and discussion.
  • Individual readings, writing, and reflection.
  • Guest faculty.
  • Oral and written presentations.


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Course Format
This course has been designed to be completed in five weeks. You will complete most of the work online. Please refer to Getting Started concerning effective utilization of WebCT. In addition, you will meet on five designated Thursday evenings to discuss the readings and to address critical aspects of an academic position in conversation with the guest faculty. You are invited to shape the content and focus of the seminars. The seminars have been scheduled from 5:00p.m. –7:30p.m. in 116 Willard Hall as follows:
  • June 7, 2007: First seminar (course context, objectives, and structure)
  • June 14, 2007: Second seminar
  • June 21, 2007: Third seminar
  • June 28, 2007: Fourth seminar
  • July 5, 2007: Final seminar
You will need to participate in all seminars unless previously discussed with instructor.

Refer to University Guidelines for Responsible Computing to assure appropriate use of computing resources.


Back to contents

 


Assignments and Grading
This course is non-credit bearing and graded on a Pass/Fail basis. The assignments are designed to help you apply the course content directly to your specific academic needs. The course consists of two types of assignments: (1) discussions for each unit; and (2) application assignments. The discussions help you synthesize and evaluate the course content concerning junior faculty appointments in your field. The applications allow you to apply the information garnered from the readings to your specific disciplinary context and to get started on your teaching portfolio.

Discussions

The discussions are described in each unit: Unit 1, Unit 2

Application Assignments
  • Guest faculty: institutional profile and questions Seminars: June 14, 21, and 28, and July 5 Team project
  • Teaching statement with copy of peer feedback July 6
  • Expectations for scholarly productivity June 30
  • Reflective audio or print journal July 7 - submit to instructor via WebCT e-mail
All assignments are listed on the "Due Dates" page.

To receive a passing grade, you will need to complete the following requirements:
  • Attend and actively participate in seminar activities. You need to attend all seminars. Inform the instructor in advance of legitimate absences.
  • Complete required readings prior to each seminar session. You need to keep up with the readings as they form the basis for assignment completion and class discussion.
  • Initiate a discussion per unit or respond to a peer's posting.
  • Keep a reflective journal throughout the course; submit to the instructor at the end of the course.
  • Complete the application assignments at a satisfactory level and submit on time.
  • Provide and incorporate constructive online feedback.
  • Participate fully in the evaluation of the entire course. Your constructive feedback is essential in enhancing this course.
Each content area unit is structured as follows:
  • Required readings provide an overview and address key concepts; they reinforce and support the seminars. Please complete required readings prior to each seminar.
  • Supplementary readings elaborate on these key concepts and provide examples and illustrations.
  • Online discussions allow you to synthesize, evaluate and think back on the readings, particularly as they pertain to your post-graduate plans.
  • Applications and online discussions are outlined in each unit. Refer to "Due Dates" or calendar to keep track of your work.
All assignments and discussions need to be completed online and submitted by the due date. Please follow the instructions for submission. You are welcome to post discussions and assignments prior to the due date.

Ethical Academic Conduct

You are responsible for understanding and acting according to the University of Delaware's policy concerning ethical academic conduct. You are expected to be honest and forthright in all of your academic work. Attempts to falsify or plagiarize will be treated in accordance with University policy.


Back to contents

 


Readings
You will find both the readings allocated for each unit. The material will be provided in two forms: (a) electronically – you can access directly in WebCT; and (b) print – a photocopy of the material will be available in the Course Reserves section of the University of Delaware Library. A listing of General Course Resources is also provided.

In addition to the resources provided in the course, also access the University of Delaware electronic library holdings, your department library, and the Internet for references.


Back to contents


Last Updated: June 4, 2007

UNIV 601 Syllabus

UNIV 601-010: Pedagogy in the University Classroom: Good Practice that Facilitates Learning

Fall Semester 2007



Course Information Course Goals Course Format
Assignments and Grading Readings Teaching Approach

 


"There is no one best instructional method - what constitutes effective teaching depends on the students, the context, the topic, and the discipline."
Barbara Gross Davis. (1993). Tools for teaching.

"We don't learn from experience; we learn from reflecting on experience."
John Dewey
 

Instructor

Gabriele Bauer, Ph.D., Assistant Director
Center for Teaching Effectiveness, 212 Gore Hall
Office Hours by appointment
Phone: 302-831-2914

Please use WebCT mail to communicate with the instructor and fellow students. I will try to reply to your e-mail messages within 24 hours.
 

Welcome 

This course has been designed for graduate students across disciplines who are pursuing academic careers. Most of you are currently teaching or have taught recently and expect to do so again within the next semester or two, and bring first-hand learning and teaching encounters to the class. Your experiences as teacher practitioners constitute an integral part of this course. You bring your experiences as both students and instructors as well as your observations of faculty to this course. I welcome your input; it is essential to making this course personally meaningful and relevant to you. I look forward to working with you and learning from you. 

 

 


Course Information
Course Description

This seminar entitled “Pedagogy in the University Classroom: Good Practice that Facilitates Learning” constitutes part of the  pedagogy track of the Higher Education Teaching Certification (HETC) program.

Context

What constitutes effective teaching and sound, research-based practice? How do we know whether we are effective and students are learning? Research on students' academic success and cognitive development has demonstrated the effectiveness of those modes of instruction that emphasize active learning and collaborative activities and engage students in intellectual discovery. The instructor's task is to interact with the students in ways that enable them to acquire new information, practice new skills, and reconfigure and expand on what they already know (Gross Davis, 1999).

This course is not focused on "teaching you how to teach" but on introducing you to practical, research-based teaching methods that facilitate student learning. The research literature in higher education provides us with a conceptual framework that we can use to understand more fully our effectiveness as instructors. This course extends the knowledge and skills that you acquired in the seminar focused on student learning, UNIV 600. It aims to deepen your understanding of learning and to help you connect that knowledge to effective instructional practice. We will translate what we know about learning into concrete instructional practice.

Principles of course design, learner-centered teaching, and assessment constitute the main focus of the seminar. You will learn about these teaching aspects from a conceptual basis, and then have the opportunity to apply them to your own instructional context. You will become more aware of how you teach, why you teach the way you do, and how you may teach more effectively to support student learning.

Through readings, discussions, and assignments we will explore the core question: How can we actively involve students  in our courses to maximize their learning?  In addition, you will have the opportunity to talk about what has been going on in the class that you currently teach and get feedback. You will be able to apply the theory and principles to your teaching right away.

The course consists of six units, each addressing a different question about teaching that supports student learning.  

Unit 1:      What is the relationship between effective teaching and student learning?
                Week of September 17

Unit 2:      How do we design courses and instruction that support learning?
                Weeks of September 24 and October 1

Unit 3:      What constitutes "active learning?" What potential barriers exist?
                Week of October 8

Unit 4:      How can we engage our students actively in their learning?
                Weeks of October 15, 22, and 29

Unit 5:      How can we assess student learning?
                Weeks of November 5 and 12

Unit 6:      Ethics of teaching and assessing your teaching- how would we know it?
                Weeks of November 19 and 26


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Course Goals
This course provides experiences and resources that will help you:
  • Acquire a working knowledge of contemporary research and principles of learning and active learning approaches.
  • Apply this conceptual knowledge to principles of effective teaching, particularly to teaching in your discipline.
  • Translate the learning principles into effective teaching practice - expand your repertoire of teaching approaches to support student learning. 
  • Become familiar with various teaching methods that support active learning and implement some of them in your teaching.
  • Become more aware of how you teach, why you teach the way you do, and how you may teach more effectively.
  • Provide a supportive forum in which to discuss aspects of your current teaching appointment.
  • Reflect on your personal teaching experiences and beliefs.
  • Speak about your teaching practice in an informed, descriptive manner and ground your practice in knowledge of student learning.
  • Start or continue to develop your teaching portfolio.
A central outcome is that you will have developed materials (e.g., reflective narratives, descriptions of teaching, class activities, assignments) that will help you document your teaching so that you will have a good start on your teaching portfolio.
 

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Teaching Approach
I believe that, given the applied nature of the course, it is critical to enable you to actively construct knowledge about teaching by engaging you in active learning activities, providing you with timely, constructive feedback, and giving you opportunities for self-assessment of your performance as well as reflection on enhancement.

You will be actively engaged in several ways: by integrating concepts from the readings into the design of teaching activities and materials, talking with faculty, receiving peer and instructor feedback on your teaching activities and materials. Your questions will also contribute to making this an active learning environment. 

Many of you will be taking the HETC program seminars at the same time, thus forming a learning community. As a member of this learning community you will engage in informed conversation about higher education with the same cohort of peers, continue to learn from each other, and provide support and resources to each other. The online discussions facilitate ongoing dialogue and reflection.
 
Instructional methods utilized in the course (both online and in the seminar):

  • Small group work and discussion.
  • Class discussion.
  • Print and video case study analysis and discussion.
  • Individual readings, writing, and reflection.
  • Guest faculty.
  • Oral and written presentations.
  • Class observation and feedback by instructor.
Any student who thinks s/he may need an accommodation/s based upon the impact of a disability should contact me. You will be referred to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Office for students with physical or emotional disabilities or the Academic Enrichment Center (AEC) for students with learning disabilities or ADHD.

 


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Course Format
You will complete most of the work on-line (WebCT environment).  Please refer to "Getting Started" concerning effective utilization of WebCT. In addition, we will meet on seven designated Tuesday evenings to discuss the readings and aspects of your teaching and to share teaching activities and materials. You are invited to determine the content and focus of the seminars. The seminars have been scheduled from 5:15p.m. – 7:30p.m. in 223 Gore Hall as follows:
  • 9-18:           First seminar
  • 10-2:           Second seminar
  • 10-9:           Third seminar
  • 10-30:         Fourth seminar
  • 11-6:           Fifth seminar
  • 11-13:         Sixth seminar
  • 11-27:         Final seminar
You will need to participate in all seminars.


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Assignments and Grading
This course is non-credit bearing and graded on a Pass/Fail basis. The interaction of theory and practice is an important element of the course. The assignments are designed to help you apply the course content directly to your specific teaching responsibilities. The course consists of two types of assignments: (1) discussions; and (2) application assignments. The discussions help you synthesize and evaluate the course content concerning actual teaching practice in your field. The application assignments allow you to apply the information garnered from the readings to your specific disciplinary context. The applications are designed to help you get started or enhance your teaching portfolio.

Discussions

The discussions are linked to the following units: Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3, and Unit 6

Application Assignments
  • Active learning activity in your discipline              demonstration starts Seminar 4, 10-30 -  team
  • Assessment tool                                                       post by 11-13
  • Learning-centered course syllabus                          post draft by 10-19; post final and present poster: 11-27
  • Teaching journal                                                    Part 1: 9-25, Part 2: 11-30 at the latest - submit to instructor via WebCT e-mail

To receive a passing grade, you will need to complete the following requirements:

  • Attend and actively participate in seminar activities. You need to attend all seminars. Inform the instructor in advance of absences.
  • Complete core readings prior to each seminar session. You need to keep up with the readings as they form the basis for assignments and seminars.
  • Complete the application assignments at a satisfactory level and submit on time.
  • Provide and incorporate constructive feedback.
  • Participate fully in the evaluation of the entire seminar. Your constructive feedback is essential in enhancing this course.
Each content area unit is structured as follows:
  • Core readings support the seminar activities and prepare you for the assignments. 
  • Supplementary readings build upon the core readings and provide additional explanations, examples and illustrations.
  • Online discussions allow you to synthesize, evaluate and think back on the readings, particularly as they pertain to your teaching. 
  • Refer to "Due Dates" or calendar for assignment descriptions and to keep track of your work.
All applications and discussions need to be completed online and submitted by the due date. You are welcome to submit your work prior to the due date.

Ethical Academic Conduct

You are responsible for understanding and acting according to the University of Delaware's policy concerning ethical academic conduct. You are expected to be honest and forthright in all of your academic work. Attempts to falsify or plagiarize will be treated in accordance with University policy.

University Guidelines for Responsible Computing to assure appropriate use of computing resources.

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Readings
You will find both the core and supplementary readings listed in each unit.  The material will be provided in two forms: (a) electronically – you can access directly in WebCT; and (b) print – a photocopy of some materials will be available in the Course Reserves section of the University of Delaware Library. A listing of General Course Resources is also provided.

In addition to the course resources, also access the University of Delaware electronic library holdings, your department library, and the Internet for references.

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Last Updated: September 13, 2007

UNIV 600 Syllabus

UNIV 600-010: Learning in the College Classroom

Spring Semester 2007



Course Information Course Goals Course Format
Assignments and Grading Readings Teaching Approach

 


"There is no universal best teaching practice. If, instead, the point of departure is a core set of learning principles, then the selection of teaching strategies . . . can be purposeful."
Bransford, Brown, & Cocking. (1999).  (eds.). How people learn: Brain, mind, experience and school.
 
 

Instructor

Gabriele Bauer, Ph.D., Assistant Director and Teaching Consultant
Center for Teaching Effectiveness, 212 Gore Hall
Office Hours by appointment
gabriele@udel.edu
Phone: 831-2914

Please use WebCT mail to communicate with the instructor and fellow students. I will try to reply to your e-mail messages within 24 hours.
 

Welcome 

This course has been designed for graduate students across disciplines who are pursuing future careers as faculty members at institutions of higher education. Most of you are currently teaching or have taught recently and expect to do so again within the next semester or two, and bring first-hand learning and teaching encounters to the class. Your experiences as teacher practitioners constitute an integral part of this course. You bring your experiences as both students and instructors and your observations of faculty to this course. I welcome your input and questions; they are essential to making this course personally meaningful and relevant to you. I look forward to working with you and learning from you. 
 

 

 


Course Information
Course Description

This course entitled “Learning in the College Classroom” reflects one content area of the Higher Education Teaching Certification (HETC) program that is designed to provide a systematic and comprehensive preparation of graduate students for their future faculty careers.  The program is open to all graduate students (both at the Masters and Doctoral levels) who intend to become faculty (regardless of discipline).

Context

People outside of academia assume that instructors have a reasonable understanding of how people learn and that they apply this knowledge to their teaching. Halpern & Hakel (2003) found that typically faculty tend to teach the way they were taught. The central goal of this course is to help you acquire a basic understanding of learning theories and principles through readings, research, discussions, and assignments that will allow you to apply cognitive theory to helping students learn in your discipline. Tom Angelo's research-based principles for improving higher learning in college classes serve as the theoretical framework for the course. 

Through this exploration of learning principles, we will discuss how our instructional choices influence student learning in our respective fields. You will also become familiar with ways to helping students learn.

The course consists of six units, each addressing a different question about learning in the college classroom.

Unit 1:      What do we know about learning?
                February 26 - March 6
Unit 2:      Does everyone learn the same way?
                March 7 - 15
Unit 3:      What helps students learn?
                March 16 - 23
Spring Break :)
Unit 4:      What are practical implications for teaching?
                April 2 - 11
Unit 5:      How can we determine if learning has taken place?
                April 12 - 20
Unit 6:      How can we help students learn about their learning?
                April 23 - 30


Back to contents

 


Course Goals
This course provides experiences and resources that will help you:
  • Acquire a working knowledge of contemporary principles of learning and cognitive development. 
  • Apply the theoretical knowledge to principles of effective teaching, particularly to teaching in your discipline.
  • Translate the principles into effective teaching practice - expand your repertoire of teaching approaches to support student learning. 
  • Identify obstacles to student learning in your discipline and ways to respond to these difficulties.
  • Provide a supportive forum in which you discuss aspects of your current teaching appointment with faculty and peers.
  • Reflect on your personal teaching experiences and beliefs based on your understanding of the principles of adult learning.
  • Speak about your teaching practice in an informed, descriptive manner and ground your practice in knowledge of student learning in your discipline.
  • Start or continue to develop your teaching portfolio.
  • Familiarize you with research and resources pertaining to teaching in your discipline.
A central outcome is that you will have developed materials (e.g., reflective narratives, descriptions of teaching, class activities, assignments) that will help you document your teaching so that you will have a good start on your teaching portfolio. 
 

Back to contents 

 


Teaching Approach
I believe that, given the applied nature of the course, it is critical to enable you to actively construct knowledge and meaning by engaging you in active learning activities, providing you with timely and constructive feedback, and giving you opportunities for self-assessment of your performance as well as reflection on enhancement.

You will be actively engaged in several ways: by integrating concepts from the readings into the design of your teaching activities and materials, interviewing faculty and peers, receiving peer and instructor feedback on your teaching activities and materials. Your questions will also contribute to making this an active learning environment. Faculty guests will share their challenges and approaches to helping students learn. 

Many of you will be taking the various content areas of the HETC program at the same time, thus forming a learning community. As a member of this learning community you will engage in informed discussions about higher education with the same cohort of peers, continue to learn from each other, and provide support and resources to each other. The online discussions facilitate this ongoing conversation and reflection.

 

Instructional methods utilized in the course (both online and in-class):

  • Small group work and discussion.
  • Class discussion.
  • Case study analysis and discussion.
  • Individual readings, writing, and reflection.
  • Guest faculty.
  • Student micro-teaching experience (short videotaped teaching presentation with group feedback).


Back to contents

 


Course Format
This course has been designed to be completed in ten weeks.  You will complete most of the work on-line.  Please refer to "Getting Started" concerning effective utilization of WebCT. In addition, you will meet on six designated Monday evenings to discuss the readings and aspects of your teaching with peers and guests, and to share teaching activities and materials. You are invited to shape the content and focus of the seminars. The seminars have been scheduled from 5:30–8:00p.m. in 315 Gore Hall as follows:
  • February 26, 2007:      First seminar
  • March 5, 2007:            Second seminar
  • March 19, 2007:          Third seminar
  • April 2, 2007:               Fourth seminar
  • April 16, 2007:             Fifth seminar
  • April 30, 2007:             Final seminar
You will need to participate in all seminars.

University Guidelines for Responsible Computing to assure appropriate use of computing resources.


Back to contents

 

 


Assignments and Grading
This course is non-credit bearing and graded on a Pass/Fail basis. The interaction of theory and practice is an important element of the course. The assignments are designed to help you apply the course content directly to your specific teaching responsibilities. The course consists of two types of assignments: (1) discussion tasks for each unit; and (2) application assignments. The discussions help you synthesize and evaluate the course content concerning actual teaching practice in your field. The application assignments allow you to apply the information garnered from the readings to your specific disciplinary context. The application assignments are designed to help you get started or enhance your teaching portfolio.

Discussions - team postings **

The discussions are linked to the following units: Unit 1, ** Unit 2, Unit 4, **,Unit 5, ** and Unit 6 **

Application Assignments
  • Midterm student feedback                                                    April 2 - Seminar 4
  • Micro-teaching: Reading related to student learning          Seminar 3, 4, and 5 - videotaped, followed by group discussion, schedule permitting
  • Student learning issue in discipline                                      April 30 - post to designated WebCT discussion
    • Topic and Description                                                March 5 - Seminar 2
    • Research - draft                                                         March 19 - Seminar 3
    • Instructional action and assessment - draft              April 16 - Seminar 5
All assignments are listed on the "Due Dates" page.

To receive a passing grade, you will need to complete the following requirements:
  • Attend and actively participate in seminar activities. You need to attend all seminars. Inform the instructor in advance of legitimate absences.
  • Complete required readings prior to each seminar session. You need to keep up with the readings as they form the basis for assignment completion and class discussion.
  • Participate in discussions.
  • Complete the application assignments at a satisfactory level and submit on time.
  • Provide and incorporate constructive online feedback.
  • Participate fully in the evaluation of the entire course. Your constructive feedback is essential in enhancing this course.
Each content area unit is structured as follows:
  • Required readings reinforce and support the seminars. Please complete required readings prior to each seminar.
  • Supplementary readings elaborate on the key concepts and provide examples and illustrations.
  • Online discussions allow you to synthesize, evaluate and think back on the readings, particularly as they pertain to your teaching in your discipline. 
  • Application assignments are outlined in the "Assignments" section and in Unit 3.
  • Refer to "Assignments" or "Due Dates" or calendar for assignment descriptions and to keep track of your work.
All application assignments and discussions need to be completed online and submitted by the due date. Please follow the instructions for submission. You are welcome to submit discussions and assignments prior to the due date.

Ethical Academic Conduct

You are responsible for understanding and acting according to the University of Delaware's policy concerning ethical academic conduct. You are expected to be honest and forthright in all of your academic work. Attempts to falsify or plagiarize will be treated in accordance with University policy.


Back to contents

 


Readings
You will find both the required readings and recommended resources allocated for each unit.  The material will be provided in two forms: (a) electronically – you can access directly in WebCT; and (b) print – a photocopy of the material will be available in the Course Reserves section of the University of Delaware Library. A listing of General Course Resources is also provided.

In addition to the resources provided in the course, also access the University of Delaware electronic library holdings, your department library, and the Internet for references.


Back to contents

 


Last Updated: February 21, 2007

Higher Education Teaching Certification Program

Higher Education Teaching Certification Program

Starting a Path to a Faculty Career

HETC Fellows' ePortfolio (video)
HETC Program Benefits
Academic ePortfolio showcase

quote1

The Higher Education Teaching Certification program approaches teaching as scholarly work and it intends to supplement, advance, and extend existing university-wide and departmental graduate teaching assistant (TA) training efforts. It is designed primarily to enhance the teaching effectiveness of TAs while at the University of Delaware and to provide a systematic preparation for all aspects of academic careers. The non-credit, optional program is open to all graduate students (both at the Masters and Doctoral levels) who intend to become future faculty. There is no tuition charge for the program. The program is offered in an online environment (Sakai), supplemented with on-campus seminars. Content areas are offered in five-or ten-week segments.

Content areas do not need to be taken sequentially; students must complete all program requirements before graduation, but they can determine the timing of the program elements to best accommodate their academic schedule and professional needs. Departmental advisement for sequencing program components is critical. Content areas are delivered throughout the academic year. Certification is awarded upon completion of all program aspects and is included in the participant’s official transcript.

Interested graduate students apply for admission directly to CTAL.
 
Current Fellows and Alumni of the HETC program are encouraged to join our LinkedIn Group.  Once you create a profile search for "HETC Program Alumni" to become a member.
 
  • Fellows
  • Photo Gallery
  • Graduates
  • Program Statistics
  • FAQ

Fellows

HETC Program Fellows currently enrolled (by department)

Department

Art History
La Tanya Autry

Art Conservation
Caitlin O'Grady (postdoc)

Biological Sciences
Erica Dasher

Center for Composite Materials
Sanjib Chandra Chowdhury (postdoc)

Chemical Engineering
Andrea Naranjo, Joseph Stanzione

Civil & Environmental Engineering
Benjamin Berwick, Mosi London, Sarq Patterson, Susan Yi

Education
Chunyan Yang

Energy & Environmental Policy
Leon Mach

English
Rita Williams

Entomology & Wildlife Ecology
David Kalb

Mathematical Sciences
Qunhui Han, Marco Montes de Oca (postdoc

Political Science & International Relations
Lauren Balasco, Zofia Maka, Faith Okpotor

Public Policy & Administration
Phillip Barnes, Lauren Clay, Lenora Felder, Dana Holz,
Erin Kerrison, Abobaker Mused,
Aaron Searson, Lucia Velotti

Sociology & Criminal Justice
Kristen Hefner, David Lane, Kevin Ralston, Samanth Zulkowski

 

 

Photo Gallery

Graduates

Department and HETC Program Graduation Date

Animal & Food Sciences
Xinhui Li (postdoc), 2012
Hudaa Neeto, 2011
Erin Bernberg (postdoc), 2006

Art History
Mark Parker-Miller, 2004

Biological Sciences
Benjamin Rohe, 2012
Lisa Gurski, 2012
Adam Aguiar, 2011
Megan Kautz, 2009

Biomechanics & Movement Science
Kota Takahashi, 2012 - Postdoc

Business Administration
Jane Luke, 2009

Chemical Engineering
Erik Welf, 2008 - Postdoc, North Carolina State University, NC
Jennifer O'Donnell, 2007 - Faculty
Aditya Singh, 2005 - Postdoc, Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, MD

Chemistry & Biochemistry
Jennifer Codding, 2012
Brad Bauer, 2011 -  Faculty, College of Saint Rose, NY
Katheryn Perrine, 2011 - Postdoc
Carol Roach, 2010 - Postdoc, University of Missori-Columbia, MO
Yuzhen Wang, 2010
Stephanie Bolte, 2009
Julie Palkendo, 2008 - Faculty, Kutztown University, PA
Jeffrey Spraggins, 2006
Paul Tobash, 2005

Civil & Environmental Engineering
Laura Black, 2012
Michelle Oswald, 2010 - Faculty, Bucknell University, PA
Kel Hannum, 2009 - Faculty
Stephan Mensah, 2009, Postdoc

Computer & Information Sciences
Li Jin, 2008
Michael Jochen, 2007 - Faculty, East Stroudsburg University, PA
Rashida Davis, 2006

Economics
Paul Larson, 2011 - Visiting Professor, West Chester University, West Chester, PA
Jane Luke, 2009
Yigit Hazim Aydede, 2006
Estelle Sommeiller, 2005
Diane Trace, 2005

Education
Bridget Brennan, 2012 - Faculty, Delaware State University, Dover, DE
Kevin Currie-Knight, 2012
Licinia Kaliher, 2010 - Assistant Director, Residence Life, Temple University, PA
Sami Nassim, 2009
Wilkey Wong, 2008

English
Jack Peruggia, 2005

Entomology & Wildlife Ecology
Christine Rega, 2012
Ellen Lake, 2011 - Postdoc
Bridget Collins, 2008
William Brown, 2006 - Faculty, Kutztown University, PA

Fashion & Apparel Studies
Yazbehl Waters, 2010

Foreign Languages & Literatures
Courtney Brunone, 2009
Claudia Janine Biester, 2008
Victoria Simoshina, 2007 
Gabriela Blue, 2005

Geography
Tianna Bogart, 2012
Daria Kluver, 2011 - Faculty, Central Michigan University
Ethan Frost, 2009 - Faculty, Millersville University, Millersville, PA
Gina Henderson, 2009 - Faculty, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD
Steven Quiring, 2004 - Faculty, Texas A&M, College Station, TX

Geological Sciences
Katherine Skalak, 2008
Adam Skarke, 2009
Hilary Stevens, 2009 - Research Associate, Coastal Resources Center, University of Rhode Island

Health, Nutrition & Exercise Sciences
James DiDomenico, 2008
Steven Malin, 2006
Julie Clymer, 2005

History
Michelle Mormul, 2009 - Faculty

Human Development & Family Studies
Michael Sturm, 2008
Juliet Bradley, 2008
Laura Thompson Brady, 2008

Linguistics & Cognitive Science
Evan Bradley, 2012
Ozge Ozturk, 2009

Mathmatical Sciences
Jennifer Miller, 2010
Xinyi Zhang, 2008 - Statistical Research Associate, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Seattle, WA
Zeying Wang, 2007
Maria Capursi, 2006 - Faculty, University of Central Florida, FL
Jiguang Sun, 2004 - Faculty, Delaware State University, DE

Physics & Astronomy
Joshua Wickman, 2012 - Faculty
Gokce Cehreli, 2006
Adebanjo Oriade, 2007 - Faculty, Bethany College, Lindsborg, KS
Dana Saxon, 2012
Joshua Wickman, 2012 -Faculty, Gloucester County College, NJ

Plant & Soil Sciences
Christine Rega, 2012
Adrienne Kleintop, 2011 - Postdoc, Colorado State University, CO
Adrienne Kleintop - plant & soil sciences, 2010
Daniel Mongeau, 2009 - Dupont
Amy Sprinkle, 2009 
Jennifer Gilbert, 2008
Olga Lazouskaya, 2008
Liping Zhang, 2007
Amanda Jones, 2006 
Carrie Murphy, 2006 - Extension Agent, Cooperative Extension Service, UD
Kurt Williamson, 2006 - Faculty, College of William & Mary, VA

Political Science & International Relations
Juliette Tolay, 2011- Assistant Professor, Penn State University-Harrisburg, PA
Nick Galasso, 2010

Sociology & Criminal Justice
Heather Zaykowski, 2011 - Faculty, University of Massachusetts- Boston, MA
Deeanna Button, 2010 - Faculty, Stockton Colllege, Galloway, NJ
Nicole Smolter, 2009 - Faculty, California State University at Los Angeles, CA
Chanele Moore, 2008 - Adjunct Faculty, Widener Univ. & Holy Family Univ., PA
Yuning Wu, 2008 - Faculty, Wayne State University, MI
Sherry Skaggs, 2008
Jessica Hodge, 2007 - Faculty, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO
Amy Cass, 2007 - Faculty, California State University at Fullerton, CA
Maggie Leigey, 2007 - Faculty, The College of New Jersey, NJ
Heather Griffiths, 2006 - Faculty, Fayetteville State University, NC
Victor Argothy, 2005

Public Policy & Administration
Kevin Adkin, 2012
Bakry ElMedni, 2012
Timothy O'Boyle, 2012
Kerrin Wolf, 2012 - Fellow, School of Law, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
Ann Johnson, 2011 - Visting Assistant Professor, SUNY Albany, NY
Cara Robinson, 2011 - Faculty, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN
Glen Silverstein, 2011
Nicole Ruggiano, 2008 - Faculty, Florida International University, FL
Jane Case, 2007

Program Statistics

  • When did the HETC program start?
    The program has been offered continuously since Winter Session 2004.
  • How many Fellows have completed the program?
    97 Fellows, representing 27 departments, have completed the HETC program. 83 of the Fellows (86%) were doctoral degree students; 14 were master’s degree students representing departments that offer the master’s as terminal degree.
  • Currently, how many Fellows are enrolled in the program?
     39 participants, representing 18 departments are enrolled in the program. 34 of the 39 Fellows (87%) are doctoral degree students. Please refer to Fellows Listing.
  • Of those Fellows that have completed the program, how many now hold academic positions?
    Of the 97 Fellows who completed the program, 45 report holding academic positions (48%); i.e., faculty positions, post-doctoral and/or research positions.
  • How has the HETC program been incorporated into departmental grant programs for graduate student development?
    Aspects of the HETC program have been incorporated into two GAANN proposals affiliated with the College of Engineering. The aim of these proposals is to educate and train graduate students to obtain careers as teacher-scholar-researchers in a vital area of need, such as transportation infrastructure engineering.
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